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ForCollegeForLife Podcast Ep.2 – Jasmine C. Williams

TRANSCRIPT

Casey:

Hey everyone. My name is Casey Cornelius, and I’m the founder and president of for college for life. I want to thank you for giving a little bit of your time today to learn a little bit more about one of our team members here at, for college for life. Since 2014, I have had the great privilege of representing some of the most awesome people in the world and the person you’re going to hear from today certainly is on that list. I think you’re going to be interested in learning more, about this speaker, about their background and also some fun facts about them along the way. So let me tell you a little bit about them first. After an unexpected loss, her freshman year of college, Jasmine Williams hit rock bottom. Now as an adversity and resilience speaker, she teaches audiences how failure and adversity can help them grow using her firsthand experiences, Jasmine helps them to support classmates and colleagues through grief, anxiety, and other difficult experiences. After years of being a professional speaker, Jasmine became a public speaking coach to help teach others how to deliver a polished message with confidence. She graduated from High Point university with her bachelor’s in communication and minor in psychology. In addition to being a professional speaker, this is pretty cool. Jasmine is a communication specialist for the US department of Veterans affairs-not nobody. Welcome to the mic. Jasmine Williams. Jasmine. It’s so good to have you.

Jasmine:

Thank you, Casey. It’s so good to be here.

Casey:

Are you nervous, Jasmine? Be honest. Are you nervous?

Jasmine:

Mm nah.

Casey:

No.

Jasmine:

I feel like this is a friendly conversation.

Casey:

It is a friendly conversation, and just before we hit record, like we’re going to pull back the curtain here for just a second. Just before we hit record. I said, Jasmine, you good? Like you nervous at all? No, no, no, no. I just got, uh, training from, was it, was it Homeland security Jasmine? Was that, is that what you said?

Jasmine:

So I did a training for someone at DHS. Yes.

Casey:

Okay. DHS, for those of you who aren’t hip to the Lango is department of Homeland security, and she’s like, and if I can do that, like this should be pretty easy.

Jasmine:

<laugh>

Casey:

I knew I was going to make her laugh. This is fun. Jasmine let’s hop in. I know that listeners will want to know more about you, your journey, and we’re going to get all those things, but I also want to talk a little bit about your programming, right? So probably what is your most signature program to date is called Stop Half-Assing It? Can you talk a little bit about that program and the philosophy of it?

Jasmine:

Sure, and it’s, it’s kind of funny. I think the title is what gets students into the chairs in the room, but it really is the message that keeps them there for the entire program and something that I explain to students when I’m speaking is that the title actually comes from a pep talk that I was giving myself during probably one of my, my most difficult seasons as a college student, myself. It came from a place of tough love when I really needed compassion and empathy and patience and grace, and those are some of the things that we talk about throughout the program along with things like time management, burnout prevention, and just overall self-love.

Casey:

And, again, we’re going to pull back the curtain a little bit more. My understanding is that there have actually been people along the way who’ve encouraged you to change that title. Is that correct?

Jasmine:

Yes, it is. I, I had so many people that felt it was too controversial and I’ll be honest, I am an open book. What you see is what you get with me and I always liked that it felt appropriately aligned with me as a person and just my personality. I think that the students that come into the room are never surprised by our interaction after seeing the title. It feels very authentic and real and so many of them have come up to me after ort of the greater conversation and pulled me aside or into the hallway and said, “Wow, that was the first time that I felt like someone really understood and accurately described what it is that I’m going through.” So if it is a little bit real, if it is a little bit tough love, I think that it’s what students need to hear.

Casey:

I agree. No, I agree completely. I think I remember the first time you and I connected and it probably was maybe about a year before we started getting to work together. Candidly folks, the, the pandemic has been a blur in terms of the amount of time, you can tell me it’s been two months or two years. It just seems like everything’s in suspended animation. But I remember when we completed our first chat Jasmine, um, just being really blown away with not only your poise, but also this presence that you have. So when you told me later on down the road about this program, Stop Half-Assing It” it seemed to be perfectly, and I hate this phrase, but it seemed to be perfectly on brand.

 

Jasmine:

Yes.

Casey:

But what you’re saying is it wasn’t a manifestation of a brand. This is something you told yourself along the way also.

Jasmine:

Yes, absolutely, and it was really, as I said, it was really a moment of very intense, what I felt like was tough love, but ultimately it was a perfect example of me being too hard on myself and trying to pull myself out of a difficult place and just expecting myself to sort of snap back into being a normal college student after I was having a not-so normal college experience, right. I was dealing with a lot of adversity and a lot of pain and doing so hundreds and hundreds of miles away from my family and the majority of my support system. So I often share that with students. I always notice that there’s at least one person in the audience who starts to tear up when I share that story of me looking myself in the mirror and telling myself to stop half assing it and pull it together, and it deeply connects with me because I’ve been there and I know exactly what that moment felt like.

Casey:

So, I know one of the challenges of a podcast or an interview like this is sort of pulling back some of the veil in terms of who we are and the things, but you and I have had some, some really deep and interesting conversations over time and that’s actually one of the evolutionary points of this podcast to begin with s my sense of like, “I have these great conversations with our folks. We have them internally. Wouldn’t it be great if we hit record” and I know we’ve referenced it a couple of times and I hope you don’t mind, but you’re first year of college, um, you, you did have an unexpected loss. Do you want to talk about that a bit?

 

Jasmine:

Yeah. So that’s part of the program as well. Is I really open up to the students about my freshman year on campus and just a week after I turned 18, I was a young, new, fresh adult and I had a very difficult experience where my mom actually came to campus to let me know that my older brother had passed away very unexpectedly. And after a few minutes of what felt like being in a movie, right, sort of an out of body experience. I went back into my dorm and my roommates, who I had only lived with for a matter of months at that point, literally packed my suitcase for me to go home to attend my older brother’s funeral. I think that was just the beginning. I think sort of this big misconception about adversity is that adversity makes you stronger, right?

 

That’s one of those things that I will just be transparent. I absolutely hate because I think it puts the action on the negative experience, right? It’s saying something bad happens to you and eventually you will grow from this, but the adversity is not actually making you stronger. I would say at least for most of us adversity does weaken us. It’s very difficult. It’s very challenging and it’s us that has to pull ourselves out of that place. It’s us, that does the work, that does the healing, that does the growth, and in this case, so much of that was grieving. The reason I think it took me so long to heal from my loss was because sort of, as I alluded to earlier, I wasn’t really allowing myself to grieve appropriately. I was sort of trying to force myself or pull myself out of that place when I just wasn’t ready to and I think that if there’s anything that I could say to people that are in a difficult place, it would be the adversity is not what makes you stronger. It is you, it is yourself that pulls you out of that dark place that does the work that does the healing. That is what makes you stronger yourself is what does the work, not the adversity.

Casey:

Oh, I agree completely and thank you for sharing Jasmine. Do you think that we’ve misunderstood in some way, the grieving process. I saw this graph one time that’s like what most people think grieving looks like, and it’s this very linear process but I don’t know about you. That’s never been my experience with grief. Do you think that maybe short changing how hard it is to go through these, these stages, these evolutionary points of grief to get to hopefully ideally a better place?

Jasmine:

I do, and I think ironically enough, that this whole experience over the last two years of the pandemic has actually helped a lot of people who maybe haven’t experienced what we would consider the traditional form of grief. I think it’s helped more people understand what that feels like to have sort of this experience that’s out of your control that alters every aspect of your life unintentionally, right so even aspects of our lives that had nothing to do with the pandemic were still altered by this experience. There was nothing that we could do to change that except sort of ride the wave and make adjustments and learn how to live this new normal is what we kept hearing people say in the early days, and I think that that’s sort of what grief is like as well. It’s this sense of new normal.

 

For me, part of what was so difficult was, I always saw my life as a before, and then after of this experience and I was fighting so hard to become the version of myself that I was before it happened again, and it took me so, so long to realize how much beauty and growth and just incredible life experiences that were on the other side of it for me once I allowed myself to sort of let go of who I was before. I think that’s something that just takes all of us a lot of time to do and it’s very difficult.

Casey:

A lot of the work that we do is with colleges and universities, what it’s being described is sort of a crisis of mental health among undergraduate students right now. In some ways, I feel like what you’re saying, and you can correct me if I’m wrong, but also kind of what I’m sensing too, is that it might not be what we would consider sort of a clinical definition of a mental health crisis but more this sort of unresolved sense of grief that we’ve gone through collectively but we don’t exactly know what to do next. Am I hearing you right about that?

Jasmine:

Absolutely. I think that that frozen feeling of not knowing where do I go from here, or can I start trying to plan my “normal life” again or will there be another variant?, Will something else pop up after this? It’s, as you said, it’s sort of a collective fear that makes some of us get in that flight, the fight or flight, right, and we’re almost in the opposite, which is freeze. I absolutely think that many of us as adults are experiencing that, but unfortunately, students from college to high school all the way down to elementary school might be experiencing that as well. And they are sometimes a more forgotten population.

Casey:

For sure. For sure. Jasmine, I’m going to transition just a little bit into another topic. I think I’ve heard you say before sort of in a confession that you are a perfectionist or a recovering perfectionist.

Jasmine:

Definitely still recovering perfectionist.

Casey:

Yeah. Yeah, so talk a little bit about your perfectionism and how it is defined or structured, uh, how you interact with the world.

Jasmine:

I love that you asked me about that because there are so few people who knew me before college and who know me now and are so close to me to this day, but I think those of them that are still my life would absolutely tell you that my sort of adoption of this perfectionist mentality actually came after my loss, and that’s a very common sort of reaction to a loss or to an unexpected life change that I don’t think we hear people talk about very often, but it actually stems from a need for control. When something in your life maybe feels very chaotic or very abstract, or you can’t just wrap your arms around one area of your life and so becoming very organized, very hyper focused on structure. It’s actually almost a coping mechanism because it helps us feel safe and so it’s almost like, okay maybe with my family right now, after this loss, things may feel very chaotic or very emotional or very all over the place but if I just organize, right, if I just clean, if I just structure, I have a sense of control in this other aspect of my life. It’s really interesting when I open up about that, how many people have said, “Wait, that makes so much sense. I wasn’t always this way, but now that I’m thinking back, it was after maybe a certain life event or a certain experience that I sort of adopted this perfectionism”, and it’s interesting because I do have to sort of force myself out of my comfort zone sometimes to remind myself that it’s okay to not have all the answers. It’s okay. If everything isn’t structured to the 59th of the 59th second. It’s okay to have flexibility and to let go of some of that rigidness, which can be really hard for people that are fighting for that structure to make them feel better about another aspect of their life.

Casey:

I remember when you first confessed to me, your perfectionist.

Jasmine:

My type A tendency.

Casey:

Yeah. Yeah. I was, I was saying to you, I almost remember the exact words I was congratulating you on the fact that you seem to be so good at sort like rolling with things, right like as adversity comes up or as changes in schedule or plans arise and trust me in the last couple of years, we’ve all experienced that, you always just seem to have this, “like, it’s cool. No worries”, and I remember one time saying to you like, “Wow, Jasmine, I just wish more people had that ability to just sort of roll with things.” I remember you saying, “Oh, no, no, no, no, this is really hard for me.” <laugh> .

Jasmine:

Yeah, it is.

 

Casey:

Like, I like structure. Yeah.

Jasmine:

Yes, absolutely but I think when things like that happen, it’s a good test for me. It sort of forces me and reminds me, I can’t control everything. I can’t put everything in these neat little boxes and I think we actually see a lot of students in particular with the everything color coded and 16 different notebooks and all of these things, and sometimes we need that reminder that life happens. Things come up, we have emergencies plans shift, priorities change, and we just have to roll with it otherwise, we’ll sort of work ourselves into a tizzy every time something happens, and like I said, it’s honestly good for me because I need the breaks every now and then

Casey:

What you’re saying is like behind closed doors, you’re, you’re still shouting about the fact that things aren’t are necessarily going according to plan all the time but it’s a practice to demonstrate to the world that you’re okay with it and that you’re flexible and everything will be fine.

Jasmine:

We have to be, we don’t have any other choice. Right. <laugh>.

Casey:

Yeah. Yeah. I, I think one of the things that strikes me as well on this topic of perfectionism and in some ways like perfection has gotten a good PR agent but I’ve seen on your challenge coin, for those of you aren’t familiar with the challenge coin is, it’s like a tangible thing that people can present to someone else typically has a word or a phrase on it or something like that challenges them and something that they could take with them in hard moments, and Jasmine’ says “There’s power in priorities and perfection leads to burnouts.” You want to talk a little bit about that burnout thing?

 

Jasmine:

Yes. So this is probably the portion of my Stop Half Assing at speech that gets the most laughs from students. because I talk about early on, maybe even the first week of college, I went to my campus activities fair and I think I lost consciousness when I was in there, but as soon as I left, I had this sudden realization that I had signed up for things that I didn’t even understand and I had joined groups.

Casey:

Do you remember an example? Like, do you remember something specific?

Jasmine:

Yeah, so I, it was funny because one of the things that I remember looking at was the student alumni council, which I did actually join and was very involved in. I remembered thinking to myself, like, wait, how can I be a student and an alumni at the same time.

Casey:

At the same time.

Jasmine:

What does this group even do? What does a student alumni council mean? I had just signed up for it kind of just for the hell of it and it was this exercise of like checking boxes, just to check boxes without knowing what I was even interested in or what I was trying to accomplish, and I show sort of these before and after pictures of myself and my roommate on day one move in day of college and then a picture of me maybe six weeks later and I’m like passed out in my bed with notebooks around me and stuff because I just hit absolute burnout from trying to do and be, and carry all of these different things at the same time. It just wasn’t realistic for the first month of my first year of college. I had no sense of priorities so everything was a priority to me and that was really difficult to sustain long term.

 

 

Casey:

I’ve heard you say, I’ve even heard you give me this advice which I think is awesome. When we’re talking about priorities, we also have to prioritize things like rest and recuperation and self-care. You’ve even said to me before, if I’ll take a little vacation or something like that, you’d be like, “Hey, you got to take vacation seriously, too” like stop half-assing Matt. That seems to be part of the core of, who you are and what you believe too.

Jasmine:

Absolutely. I tell people if you’re going to take a sick day from work, if you’re not feeling well, I remember one of my first jobs post-graduation I came into work one day and I was disgustingly sick, like should not have been around other people, sneezing, coughing everywhere and my boss at the time came and pulled me aside and she was like, Jasmine, please go home. There is nothing here that is that urgent that you need to deal with today, please go home and the perfectionist in me was a little bit upset about it like I was being reprimanded and sent home for the day. But over the years, I’ve really adopted this mentality of if I’m taking a sick day, if I’m going to be off today, I’m going to have a slurpee for breakfast at seven in the morning, and I’m going to watch three hours of TV on Netflix and I’m going take a nap and I’m going to do all of these things and I’m going to really actually try to feel better.

 

I’m not going to check my work email every 10 minutes. I’m not going to just dial in for one meeting. No, if you’re sick, be sick and let yourself actually be sick, get it out of your system, and then you can help your body feel better instead of trying to be pulled in 16 different directions at once and that’s when we tend to half ass things. So if you’re sick, if you’re on vacation, if you’re at work, if you’re at home, wherever you are be all there.

Casey:

You reference something in that answer to that I don’t want it to gloss over anyone’s head. You reference something that you have a deep I don’t want to call it irrational, but certainly abiding affection for, and that is the seven 11 slurpee.

Jasmine:

Well, a Coke Slurpee, specifically.

Casey:

Coke Slurpee.

Jasmine:

I want that included for the record. Yes.

Casey:

If anyone listening to this has a connection with seven 11 and is looking for, I don’t know, like a sponsorship opportunity or like a spokesperson brief.

Jasmine:

Coke Slurpees for life. That’s all I am asking.

Casey:

There you go, so July 11th is Jasmine’s favorite day.

Jasmine:

Yes, absolutely.

Casey:

Other things that people might find interesting about you, Jasmine, you are, I think this would be an appropriate word. You are just a voracious reader.

Jasmine:

Yes.

Casey:

Can you share how many books you read, some of your favorite genres? I know you read a lot?

Jasmine:

Yes a lot.

Casey:

Can we talk about that?

Jasmine:

I will not nerd out too much here, but yes. I love to read. I’ve loved to read since I was really, really young. My mom said my sister and I we have always both been readers, and my favorite thing in the world is to just read on the beach or outside in the sun somewhere. That is like my perfect day but I think it’s interesting because I used to read all the time and then after I graduated and I started to work, I sort of fell out of the habit, and then when I started taking the Metro, being in the DC area, I took the Metro for work and I started reading again, because you’ve got, you know each way. So we’ve got time to kill and I would read my Kindle or a book or something and during the pandemic, I wasn’t commuting anymore and so I suddenly lost my reading time. Once I got back into it, I realized like how great it was for my mental health, just to kind of take that, it’s literally like an escape into a different world, and so, I mean I read pretty much anything, but I love thrillers, very suspenseful novels. I love personal development books, obviously, given what we do. I love business books, memoirs, all the things, all the books.

Casey:

It’s funny because there are times that folks will throw out a book or like, “Oh, I’m thinking about reading this or I just started reading this”, and almost always, I see Jasmine saying, “Oh yeah, I read that. You’ll really enjoy it, and also if you follow Jasmine, a lot of times her stories and stuff like that will be her in different places, sometimes on an airplane, sometimes on a deck, whatever it is with Kindle in hand. So, is that the go-to, the digital reader is your preference?

 

Jasmine:

I fought so hard against the Kindle life for so, so long and a few years ago, my mom actually got me one for my birthday and I was like, “This is the greatest thing ever. Why was this the hill that I was willing to die on that I would not be on the Kindle but it’s so nice because you can check books out from your library and stuff and just download them to your Kindle. You can buy stuff from Amazon on your Kindle. It’s amazing. Highly recommend!

Casey:

I’ve heard people say like the members of the e-reader club will say things like but I don’t want it to be on a tablet. I don’t want it to be on my iPad or in an app because I can just as easily be distracted with something else. I like the physical structure of an e-reader. Is, that you too?

Jasmine:

Yes. It’s separate from, I can’t click over and like scroll Instagram on my Kindle.

Casey:

Yeah, yeah. For sure. So you referenced not having to commute during the pandemic and getting these hours in your day back, but also creating some different structures and so forth. I guess we need to talk about one of the most important topics. I know I’m exposing something about you here, Jasmine, and I promise that I would be good about this, but you have one of the world’s most adorable roommates.

Jasmine:

Of course.

Casey:

Tell us a little bit about Duke.

 

 

Jasmine:

Yes. He is probably in my unbiased opinion, the world’s most photogenic dog on the planet. He will smile.

Casey:

Yes.

Jasmine:

For a good picture but yeah, it’s funny because when I got him, he is a Bernie’s mountain dog shepherd mix, which means he is a very big fan of the snow in the winter and the cold, which I don’t know if you can hear it in my voice, but that’s not my vibe. I like to be in the sun with a book and so I say to people all the time, I mean, man, I really didn’t calculate that through all the way because we kind of have opposite seasons where we thrive, but I think that that helps us balance each other out.

Casey:

Duke has a particular affinity for the Starbucks pop cups. Is that correct?

Jasmine:

Yes. A good cappuccino any day of the week.

Casey:

Okay. That’s like his Coke slurping.

Jasmine:

That is his Slurpee exactly.

Casey:

Okay. Okay. All right. Listen, I’m not exaggerating this. If you follow Jasmine, you will see photos of duke and it does look like he’s smiling. This is not an exaggeration.

 

Jasmine:

Yeah. He’s a very happy dog.

Casey:

He’s a very happy dog and clearly very well taken care of and his addiction to Starbucks is being met on a frequent basis.

 

Jasmine, let me ask you this question. This is sort of, I don’t know, maybe you expected this, maybe not like what’s one thing that people would be surprised to know about you?

Jasmine:

Oh I think something people would be surprised by is that I am actually a very serious person because I have this very light, bubbly, energetic kind of personality but I would say I actually have a very serious mentality; mentally very structured, very focused and driven. Sometimes ironically enough, I think when people meet me and we start to have a conversation or we start to work together, I almost always get the inevitable “You were not what I was expecting.” I think sometimes the dimples and the curly hair, people are expecting sort of this like ditzy version of me that doesn’t really exist but I’m actually a very serious person, very focused. I love to learn, I love to work and just to make a difference in the people that I work with is really important to me and I don’t know that that always aligns with my personality I’ll say.

Casey:

I think as someone who gets to work with you and someone who I consider myself a friend, I think if you’re underestimating Jasmine, because of the dimples or whatever it is, you are really on base because we spend hours each month together as a team and Jasmine, whether she’s has been newer on the team over the last period of time or there have been people who’ve come at, she always has her stuff together she’s always prepared. She always asks the right questions. She always provides insight so if you’re expecting that somehow those dimples mean that she’s a pushover, that is far from the truth.

Jasmine:

I’m sure some of our team members would agree with that right Odell.

Casey:

Maybe yeah. Yeah. Maybe, maybe it’s the head fake, maybe it’s the head fake. Jasmine, this has been a lot of fun. I have some, some fast questions. Would you be interested in answering five fast questions?

Jasmine:

Oh, I feel like I’m on Ellen right now.

Casey:

I know. I know, but by the way, the, the answers don’t have to be fast. The questions are fast, but the answers take hour long. You’re on, it’s your show.

Jasmine:

Okay. I’ve got my buzzer ready.

Casey:

Okay. Excellent. Here we go. So you have an entire day to binge watch anything. What do you choose?

Jasmine:

I think anyone

Casey:

And don’t half ass it now like you get to.

Jasmine:

I think anyone that follows me will know the answer to this question, which is Gilmore girls. So I have seen every episode of every season of Gilmore girls, probably five times.

Casey:

Wow.

Jasmine:

It’s so funny because when I was in middle school, I actually got strep throat really bad and I was out of school for quite some time, and this was pre Netflix, pre Hulu pre anything like that. My mom came home from work one day and at the time we had one of those like six disc DVD changers. That was cool.

Casey:

Oh yeah, oh yeah.

Jasmine:

That was our Netflix back then, right?

Casey:

Oh yeah.

Jasmine:

And I remember her coming home from work with a Coke Slurpee in one hand because she loves me and she’s a good mom.

Casey:

Of course.

Jasmine:

And the eight pack, it was like all eight seasons or six seasons or something like that of Gilmore girls on DVD. Her idea was okay. I can like stick you on the couch for a few hours while I’m working and since I can put multiple ones in the DVD player at the same time, you don’t even have to get up to change or press play or change the DVD. You can just switch to the next one and I’m pretty sure I watched multiple seasons before my strep throat healed. But to this day, if I’m sick or just like feeling down, that is really my comfort show and I think that’s where that comes from is that, that middle school experience with my mom.

Casey:

Some of our listeners, I just want to put it out there, have zero concept about what a DVD changer is, but at the time.

Jasmine:

Oh, I’m sure.

Casey:

It was the “Do you want to keep watching before Netflix said, do you want to keep watching?”

Jasmine:

Exactly, exactly.

Casey:

Okay. Excellent. All right, here we go. What is the most used app on your phone?

Jasmine:

This is a hard question because I am definitely not proud of this, but I am one of those people that’s like addicted to my phone and sometimes if you follow me, you will definitely notice this. Sometimes I have to force myself to take social breaks or things like that because I go down that rabbit hole real bad. Right now it’s probably Instagram. I’ve been really into Instagram these days, but sometimes it’s the Libby app, which is like the library app, because you can listen to audio books on there. So I’d say one of those two, for sure.

 

 

 

Casey:

Okay. Well, certainly alphabetical either Libby or yeah, no, that’s good. Wow, that one actually sort of oddly it surprised me, but I shouldn’t be surprised by it because you’re such a reader that makes complete sense.

Jasmine:

You were expecting it to be the calendar app probably right.

Casey:

Probably, know you have a lot of structure. I know you have a lot of structure for sure. All right, here we go. Who would you most want to have dinner with?

Jasmine:

I wish that I had like a very deep philosophical, insightful answer to this, but I am as authentic as it gets. So I’m just going to be a 100% honest and it’s Beyoncé. I mean, that’s the only appropriate answer to this, so I’m not going to lie and say some political person or someone from history. Nope, it’s Beyoncé.

Casey:

Okay. So, we’re having dinner with Beyoncé. Not we, you. You’re having dinner with Beyoncé.

Jasmine:

I love that. You just invited yourself.

Casey:

Yeah, no, no, no, no. I mean, I would like cater or something. What are you having? What’s the atmosphere? Where are we at?

 

 

 

Jasmine:

Oh gosh. Well, I mean, queen B, I would have everything’s up to her wherever she wants to go, whatever she wants to eat. I think this is one time where I would love my flexible side show; whatever she wants I’m down.

Casey:

This is a perfect answer. That was, that was actually fantastic. That was great. Speaking of down, what do you do to wind down? Do you have any sort rituals or do you have any patterns where you go, “Okay, this is the moment that I’m going to relax and here’s what I’m going to do.” What do you do to wind down?

Jasmine:

Ooh, I have a really good routine for this. So I am a big writer as much as I love to read. I also like to write so something that I do every single day is journal, and I think a lot of busy bees journaling is so, so good for us because we just tend to build up a lot of clutter in our brains. You’re bouncing from meeting to meeting and you’re doing all these different things, which are phenomenal, but things tend to just build up in our brains because we’re humming from thing to thing all the time and so I love to journal. I think it just helps me brain dump a lot of things out, work on ideas and other things out, vent some things out in my journal. Sometimes my journal has seen quite a bit. Another thing I like to do sort of during my wind down routine as affirmations, and I know some of our other speakers talk about that as well, highly, highly recommend that process. I think it’s so good for everyone and I also love like a good candle with my kindle somewhere. I think that’s like my perfect transition.

Casey:

Is there a fragrance? Is there a particular or does it depend on seasoned mood, all that other kind of stuff.

 

 

Jasmine:

I like candles that smell like someone else is baking something because I’m not baking anything.

Casey:

That’s more like someone else’s baking, something.

Jasmine:

Yes. That’s like a really important part of the procedure but right now I have a strawberry shortcake candle from Bed Bath & Beyond, and it just smells fantastic.

Casey:

Okay. So if any of you are thinking about gifts, Jasmine prefers candles that smell like someone else is cooking something

Jasmine:

Don’t miss that part.

Casey:

I’ve been saying to people for a long time, if you don’t yet know the name, Jasmine Williams, you should. If you’re listening to this podcast, you want to learn more about her, please check out her page on our website forcollegeforlife.com/jasmine, all kinds of great stuff about our programs, about her bio information. If you want to bring her to your campus, to your event so forth, she’s just been doing some incredible work. Jasmine, we’re going to get you out here on one last question, where can listeners best connect with you?

Jasmine:

Yeah, so if you want to see all of the things that I’m reading, as Casey said, and mainly I know you’re just coming for cute pictures of my dog. The best place to find me is on Instagram or Facebook @MissJasmineCWilliams.

Casey:

Excellent. Everybody, Facebook, Instagram, MissJasmineCWilliams. Please make sure you connect with her. Show some love, share this podcast, give it likes comments, all that other kind of stuff. We really want to sort of pull back the curtain, let you get to know our folks, our team a little bit better. Jasmine, this is so fun for me on a personal level to get to know a little bit more about you and learn some things that I didn’t know coming into the podcast. So I certainly appreciate getting to share the mic with you tonight.

Jasmine:

Thank you. The pleasure is all mine.

Casey:

All right, everybody till the next time, we’ll see you then. Thank you.

 

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